Maritime Structures

Maritime Structures

The coasts of New England have provided resources for human activity since the pre-colonial period. AHS’s expertise extends to piers, wharves, dikes, canals, and lighthouses. We prepared National Historic Landmark documentation for the Eagle, the U.S. Coast Guard’s sail-training ship. 

Featured Project

Long Wharf Pier

In connection with environmental review studies of proposed improvements to Route I-95, AHS researched the history of the Long Wharf pier in New Haven Harbor. Extending 650 feet in to the New Haven Harbor, the pier is a concrete slab and riprap (stone rubble) structure built in the 1960s. Historic research and low-tide kayak and walkover inspection revealed, however, that the base of the wharf is a stone- and earth-filled structure built in 1810 by William Lanson, a prominent member of the city’s African American community. That structure was a 1500-foot extension of an 18th-century timber wharf, making it, at 3900 feet, the longest wharf in the country at the time. Financed by a group of New Haven’s 18th-century merchants, Long Wharf was key to the city’s prosperity.

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Other Project Example

Mohegan and Long Rock Dikes

Two 19th-century stone dikes, or training walls, were documented in the Thames River. Built to remediate the constant fill accumulation that was obstructing commercial shipping, the dikes are  historically significant.  

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Central Vermont Railroad Pier

AHS assessed the archaeological and historical significance of the Central Vermont Railway Pier in New London in advance of utility improvements.

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For more information on AHS’s experience and capabilities, visit our expertise page.